No Entry

© 2012 Michael Fiveson

A door with no knob suggests visitors are not wanted. While no one can get in, apparently no one can get out either, and the souls I heard scratching and pleading remain forever.

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42 thoughts on “No Entry

  1. Definitely looks like no one can get in or out…not only is the door missing a knob, the windows look boarded up, with prison-like metal bars too. Oh, and your description makes the place all too spooky. Hahaha!

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    • Not that I am aware of. I thought they were all in California? We did have POW camps for German soldiers, right up the road from my house actually.
      I’ll google the internment camps…….which by the way, I think was a very sad chapter in American history.

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      • Your image brought to mind previous pictures I’d seen of internment camps (or even some POW camps.) I read quite a bit about the camp in Topaz, Utah. Out in the middle of the desert. I’m surprised they actually had them in California since the supposed logic was to move all these folks as far as possible from the coast. I googled, but didn’t dig deep enough apparently. Yes, a very sad chapter, indeed. Some parallels to our current reaction to 9/11.

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      • We are an imperfect country functioning in a dysfunctional world. Our non reactions (Syria) are often as bad as our overreactions. The older I get the more I understand the numerous examples of in what way we come up short (medicine and health insurance, education, mortality, care for the poor, etc etc) I measure this as how we compare to the rest of the world statistically. I am a veteran and a patriot, but as often as not I am ashamed and mortified.

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  2. Ashamed and mortified seems appropriate for our current trajectory. We can only hope for a pendulum swing where greed and money don’t entirely shape our world.

    Could that building have come from the POW camp you mentioned? The google link mentioned building being moved from the other camps.

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    • No Gunta, that building is in my home town and was part of a industrial silo complex next to some rail road tracks. The POW camp, or any remnants from it, are located elsewhere. Now could it be a building that was moved from that camp? I suppose that is possible. I get the sense that you are getting a sense here, yes?

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  3. I love the triangle of grey along the top. Why is it that when I look at this photograph I’m reminded of late 60s cinematography, particularly films such as In Cold Blood or Cool Hand Luke? It’s not so much the subject…but something about the ‘feel’ of it.

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    • That’s interesting Alex but the closest I can come to an answer is that perhaps I was influenced by the cinematography of that time as I was of that time, and earlier. Both of those are classic films and I was there, in a manner of speaking.

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  4. What IS this place? I struggle to understand our collective mentality and why we are so cruel to each other. I don’t know anything about Noam Chomsky, but I read a quote recently that helped to explain the illogical positions we take.
    “The indoctrination is so deep that educated people think they’re being objective.”
    Hmmm. Explains some of the people’s politics anyway… 🙂
    Curious and fascinating building.

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    • Great quote. Actually makes perfect sense. The building is next to rail road tracks, and very close to a large silo complex. It was all boarded up as you see it although there may have been a real (locked) door on the other side. I am going to post another photo of just a piece of it, from the side where you’ll see some more curiosities. It will be in color and will have a red light fixture of sorts. As to why this building looks like a prison, that is the question for me. Could it have been a jail at a point in time? Maybe its where the rail road kept the hobos they caught.
      Thanks for the quote, I don’t know Noam Chomsky either. But I would have a drink with him. And you.

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      • The new header photo is so perfect for you..I mean perfect. I have read quite a selection of Noam’s work and seen him speak on a few occasions. He is one of the brightest and most illuminating men of our age. Sadly, his illuminations make me sad and almost always angry to be an American. I know this is not a political blog Mike, just knowing that 2 of my favorite bloggers are discussing such a complex man makes me smile.

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