Of Long Ago

While driving through back roads I came upon an old abandoned home…

I went inside to take a look and this first picture was in the living room looking inward toward a bedroom and the kitchen.

I thought the light spilling into the bedroom was fabulous and surreal.

I moved into the kitchen and could feel that life was once very hard here. Again the light was pastel in quality.

I moved next into the bathroom and in here I felt an eerie presence.

This is a view from the hallway, dripping with light, leading to the back door.This picture was from the living room as I was leaving. There were all kind of droppings throughout the house and this couch was especially nasty.

ยฉ 2012 ย Michael Fiveson

Looking past the filth I was able to get a feel for how difficult life would have been in this small home where crops and cattle would have been tended on many acres of land. That is not to say that a happy and loving family did not grow up here. My best guess is that this home was from the 1930’s or 40’s.

128 thoughts on “Of Long Ago

  1. Bet you could push that over with a little pressure from your finger if it didn’t split in two first!

    I like the double gabled roof design, it’s really very attractive. And the last owners liked pastels, like colors from the garden.

    I wonder if they raised chickens??

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  2. As you know I love old buildings. Like Elisa, the profile is quit pleasing. The aqua and pinks are 50s colors as are the fake tiles. We purchased our home in the 60s and the kitchen was the same shade of aqua – First room we remodeled!

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  3. As much as intriguing old abandoned houses are, especially out in the open country they could be death traps if you enter for dangers such as, poisonous snakes, recluse spiders, killer bees nests, rotten wooden floors that cave in, rusted nail all over (Tetanus) etc. just to name a few.
    Be extremely careful when you enter those houses! Nice post! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  4. Mike, I love these photos. The beauty of this house shines through even with all of the wear and tear. I’d risk infection, insect/rodent/snake bites, and broken limbs for the chance to photograph something like this. Great work!

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  5. Adventuresome soul! I’m glad you went in and hope you escape any poisons. I can almost smell the dust and grime. I remember visiting my grandparents in a small two-bedroom home on a small farm in Wyoming. They raised nine kids in that place! The girls slept in one of the bedrooms while the boys slept wherever they could in the living room. Crazy! I’m sure there were good times and bad times both in this little house you photographed. I love it!

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  6. I could imagine the eerie presence, did you feel relieved when you stepped out of the house and back into the sunshine and fresh air? There seem to be so many wooden buildings round your way, is wood the predominant construction material for modern houses where you are? I do hope you remain virus free…

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    • Yes, it felt real good to be out of that house and breathing again. And yes, I think that the new construction I see out here is framed in wood. If i get the hanta virus the first symptom is it makes you feel 63……so how will I know?

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      • Ha ha, that’s a very specific symptom! I don’t know anything about the hanta virus but I expect tea would ward it off, as it has magical qualities. A bit of chocolate would no doubt help, too. Might as well try it, just to be on the safe side. I would.

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      • Hanta virus is from breathing in spores from mouse droppings and can be fatal.
        Yes, tea and chocolate should do the trick quite nicely. Good tip!

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  7. Mike, I love these shots. Great light and colors. The shot of the couch is especially good. I’m inspired by your adventure. I just posted some shots of an abandoned building myself today. I hope I have a chance to go IN!

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  8. These shots are excellent. The color of pink all around suggests something far less sinister than the demise of this house. What balls you have to roll up in here my friend. I am not sure I would have followed you into this clearly haunted haven

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  9. There was a life once upon a time,
    in this abandoned home
    Lilac and blue walls;
    lovely ktichen
    still talking
    with a full of sun touches
    from the windows…

    The story what left us
    unknown
    could it be a restricted are
    because of the hanta virus…
    or just an unforgotten life
    under the sunny blue skies…

    Thank you dear Mike, these are wonderful photographs… So inspirational too. And be careful for next time, I don’t want you die… With my love, nia

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  10. Glad you didn’t find Jason Voorhes living in there. I get the impression the place was viciously vandalized and that it was not that bad when its inhabitants lived in there.

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  11. I think you have found another career. You photos and commentary of doors and buildings are truly amazing. As I shared before, I hope you are seriously considering submitting your work for publication.

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  12. Love the house! I love the quality of disrepair and the cuteness of the layout. Love the roof line and the little porch. Can’t imagine life was easy, for sure.

    I could see the energy that still haunts the place, even if you subtract the animal energy from the ones taking refuge and polluting the place with their poop.

    Hated the pink -.-

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  13. I love old abandon houses, wishing I could hear the stories they tell. I’ve photographed them in the past, but these days they seem to get bulldozed too soon. It constantly amazes me how quickly they deteriorate when it is left vacant.

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    • Lots of abandoned houses these days. Whats that show…..the world without humans……a timeline of how quickly nature would retake the earth. At best we are temporary visitors.

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  14. I could still hear them singing Happy Birthday…and see a little Christmas tree in the corner of the living room…and someone quietly singing Away in the Manger…quiet notes not yet free from their holding.

    The things we will never know….

    Thank you, Mike.

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  15. Great shots…a neat photo narrative. I too love exploring abandoned houses and barns, however, I haven’t done so since I left the countryside of the midwest and Georgia.

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  16. Absolutely great find, Mike!

    I have a feeling it was quite a nice little house way back when…feeling the architectural style is similar to some Sears Catalog places I’ve seen throughout the years…maybe even mid-to-late 1920s.

    Wonderful shots…hate the 1950s colors. I would imagine your county government may have some more info on the property, and who last occupied it.

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    • Thank you. You are right it does have a Sears feel to it. I have no idea what the address of that house might have been and outside of taking pictures, I have little interest in pursuing it. Your comment is appreciated. Hope you have a good day.

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    • Yeah, I was quite surprised to drive past it and I turned around to go exploring. It was in the middle of nowhere. Thank you for this comment, it was gracious.

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  17. I love old buildings….and this was a treat. I mean seeing it from the computer was nice! I can’t imagine how it smelled in real life. There were some nice details at one point. The gables, the porch design, large windows, tile in the bathroom…..that tile was something I didn’t expect to see.
    Great find. Thanks for sharing. And thanks for visiting my blog!

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    • In truth I don’t think I was breathing through my nose in there, and I did a quick walk through and got the photos I wanted. Thank you for taking the time to comment.

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  18. Great photos Mike! Makes me wonder who were the people who used to call this place home? Where are they now? Why did they leave? And at the same time, I get a haunting eerie feeling, wondering if “anything” might call this place home now.

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    • I think the home was from long ago and has been empty for some time. Children who might have grown up there would be elderly today. It was full of droppings….large droppings…..cats? Although I didn’t see any animals, something with 4 legs lives there. Thanks for the visit Vincent, I trust you are well?

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  19. There are two entities in this house. One is a young man wearing cowboy boots. Either a rancher or farmer, but it feels like he’s a rancher. And, yes…life was not easy. The other entity is his mother. She lingers in the kitchen. She’s sad. And tired.

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  20. I love these photos… you are much more daring than I. I see many old barns and abandoned houses but my fear of snakes would keep me out! I saw my first two snakes of the year last Saturday while morel mushroom hunting. Egad!

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  21. Love these photos – there is a historical significance to them. Although derelict its a flashback to the past and the story of attempted survival and the sadness of defeat.
    Magical – makes you wonder

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  22. Pingback: โ€ฆthings I LOVED! Week April 2nd through April 8th « …things I LOVE!

  23. I am fascinated by old homes like this. I know the feeling, like the people who lived there may still be around in one form or another. I found a place once during one of my photo trips where the bed was turned down and an old hat and shirt still hung by a mirror. Creepy in a way, but also very touching.

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    • That would be touching, having tangible proof of who was there once upon a time. I am fascinated by old abandoned homes but think I need to be careful about going in with no mask and just sneakers.

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  24. It’s just so hard picturing this home as a vital residence in its heyday (or “hay days”). It makes you want to see a picture of the “then” and know the dates it was built and abandoned.

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  25. I love to find old houses like this one. They are so “full” in all their emptiness. Don’t you just wish they could talk? Your photography is beautiful. And thanks for checking out my blog today. I’m glad to have discovered yours!

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  26. Hej from Sweden !
    I love the photos! They really make one think and wonder just who lived in t hat house, how did they live, were they happy or was it just a struggle, were there children, was there love. I would like to think that although life of the 30’s and 40’s had to have been a struggle, that the people who lived here were able to have a happy life in each others company. I want to think of the children, if there were children, enjoying mommy’s good country cooking and maybe even bedtime stories. I hope the lady of the house was able to be a lady even though she most likely worked the farm alongside her husband. I hope she had flowers to place in containers around the house. But most of all , I hope there was love in that little house in the middle of nowhere.
    Thank for liking my post today, by the way!
    Welcome back for more updates; I am a bit behind and need to catch up before the babies arrive.

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