Red Door 5

© 2012  Michael Fiveson

This is Red Door 5 in a six door series. This cute little vertical door is different from all the others as it is divided into two pieces that open independently.  I suppose this enabled business to be done by opening just the top portion, while the closed bottom kept people out. Again, the paint is eroding away revealing a palate of wonderful colors and textures.

 

 

62 thoughts on “Red Door 5

  1. As if there are different times on the painted door… I mean had many times painted… I thought of this… Impressive. The top one like a window or to have a fresh air…. BUt yes, should be something in there that they didn’t want this to go out…. 🙂 I can go on to write a story… Thank you dear Mike, I love your door series, with my love, nia

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  2. Love the combination of colours, and great find on the door – I love spending time finding new favourite doors – London’s full of doors set into walls that seem to disappear somewhere strange and secret!

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  3. This is a lovely one, and I really like the hinges. I can imagine running a little cake dispensary from in there. I would like people to walk by and I could hand them cakes out of the top door as they passed. In between customers I’d gaze out with a cup of tea in my hand, enjoying the breeze wafting in through the open top door. What a wonderfully evocative picture you’ve conjured up with your beautiful photograph.

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    • LOL, and I am plumping for one of your wonderful cakes. Sine the door is not 30 feet from the rail road tracks, we might call your venture “cakes off the track”. I will provide the muscle here, keeping derelicts at bay. You may pay me with cakes and tea, and stories of Scotland.

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      • Cakes off the track is a great name! You’ve got yourself a deal there, as soon as I start making millions on my book sales I’ll be setting up a cake shop near you.

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      • For every two cakes you bake, I will eat one, becoming, at long last, the 500 LB man that has long wanted to manifest and burst forth from this otherwise normal frame. Can’t wait!!

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  4. I love this. I’m trying to figure out why doors are so intriguing to see photographed. I am always drawn to photos of doors like the ones you photo. Funny thing, isn’t it

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  5. The door style is like stable door where horses could stick their heads out.
    Mike, you have a tendency toward the rustic, vintage objects, thread of wood, rusted metal. Great elements for sharp and textured photography. You are defining your style and signature! 🙂

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    • You are spot on about the horse type door! I wonder if a sweet horse didn’t once reside there?
      Thank you for your keen observation about my eye and style. I think you are exactly right.

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  6. Hello Mike,
    This is an interesting door. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a dutch door with the break so high. I am thinking maybe it was cut with a second door overhead to allow the passage of extremely tall equipment/tools. Hmmm, this door leaves room for the imagination to wander, doesn’t it?

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    • It certainly does Marcy. A few people have mentioned a horse door and I like that, but wonder too what else it could have been. It is curious for sure.
      Thank you for the comment my friend.

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  7. Nice photo again. This is the kind of door one could find a stable or similar animalstorage place behind. I have seen someone fly out of the top of a similar door after trying to ‘tame’ a horse that had come down of drugs after having been bought at a horse auction. Quite a sight. After that guy a one armed gipsy went in without a pitchfork, actually had a physical fight and calmed the horse down. Worst thing of course is the horse getting drugged up again and resold on the auction. This is the incident from my horse days your door reminded me of.

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    • Not a good image, the guy and the pitchfork and the poor horse. But you are the second person to mention a horse door and I did not consider that, and so it may well have been. But the horse behind this door was fed carrots by neighborhood children and was known quite affectionately as gentle and sweet.

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  8. Hmmm….I’m wondering just what kind of business was conducted from that top portion of the door.

    Another brilliant shot, Mike. I definitely enjoy the vertical-ness of it!

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    • Yes, it is actually a narrow door but could have held an anorexic horse or perhaps even a normal sized one. Maybe someone sold a product from the open top. Muffins, feed, seeds, spices, grain alcohol. Hard to know, fun to speculate.

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  9. This conjures up all kinds of quick stories in my head.

    A stable boy leaning out over the bottom portion to steal a quick kiss from the parlour maid as she dashes by to get fresh milk for the morning.

    A baker (inspired by Cakes off the track) watching the young women in the market going by on their business.

    Perhaps a shady deal for moonshine was made through the opening in this door.

    Or a pair of old men, one inside and one out, smoking pipes together because the missus won’t let him smoke inside.

    Love the picture! I find doors are often the cover of a book and you takes such wonderful pictures of them it’s easy to imagine what might be behind the covers.

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    • There was some melting, dripping snow water when I took this. In next weeks final installment called Hell Door, you will see some more drippage ( I made that word up.) When I say your name, Marielba, it dances off my tongue, and is as nice as any name I have ever heard.

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  10. Call me crazy but i really like the hinges on this door.. 2 red and 2 silver, are the silver ones new? or did the paint just chip off? makes you wonder… great find!

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    • Thank you. I am guessing that the silver hinges were put on after the other ones rusted off, and never got painted, probably because the door was abandoned about that time. Just a guess, of course.

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      • You’re welcome! That is the fun of these types of photos.. you can really tell many stories from each one 🙂

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    • A very quick google search reveals that On August 1, 1876, Colorado was granted statehood. I should have known that without looking because I was here in 1976 and it was a big deal, that 100 year celebration. But Lincoln could have passed thru prior to statehood so you may be right!
      BTW, it pleases me greatly that you like these doors. Thank you.

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  11. I love your door series… takes me back… makes me think… appreciating the past… hope for the future…. (especially hoping we don’t destroy these beautiful photo opportunities and the memories they hold)

    Thanks for visiting my blog… and for bringing me here….
    ~Ann

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    • Hi Christie. Not much of a story that I know about. The door is on the back of a very old bean company that is no longer in business. This particular warehouse has 6 doors that are all red, fading, and are no longer in use. That is all I know, and thank you for looking and commenting.

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  12. Pingback: …things I LOVED! Week March 19th through March 25th « …things I LOVE!

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